Hell no, I don’t want a billionaire to ravish me.

Caution: Mom do not read this blog post. Well, you’re an adult, so go ahead and read it if you want, but I’m warning you now, I’m explaining my viewpoint on romantic or erotic literature with jerks as male love interests. Also I know I have written about this topic before and it wasn’t the most popular post…

The reason I’m bringing it up today is a super confused guy mentioned, “Girls want to be ravished by billionaires.”

No, I’m not kidding. Btw, he wasn’t saying this with any disrespect and obviously expected me to understand the reference.

First of all: Any generalization about 50% of the population is likely to be wrong.

I told Super-Confused-Guy in no uncertain terms I DO NOT want to be ravished by a billionaire. Not even in fantasy. So here is my warning to billionaires and other super special snowflakes that make up book boyfriends: if you try to ravish me, I’m calling the cops. Sorry, but I’m pragmatic like that.

I am in a monogamous marriage, but I’m an active partner. Being the female does not make me passive or submissive. During sex, I give my consent (and so does my husband btw) I am not plied into doing anything I don’t want, nor would I ever force my husband to do something he doesn’t want. There is no gray area.

Secondly, my favorite books deal with personal relationships as well as other ideas or themes. I am not a huge reader of romance or erotica and tend to read them as an author which means I am breaking it down. However, I do have a lot of respect for the genres for their ability to hold tension.

But no matter what the genre: “Alphas” who intimidate women or make decisions for them can step the f*** off. In books, they steal kisses or “play” threaten or actually use physical violence. They push alcohol to ply their victims into doing what they want. They push for commitment early. They are possessive under the guise of being protective — an ugly trait in my opinion.

Why can they do this? First of all, they’re rich and handsome–and in a spicy books, they are also well-endowed.

You know who else is possessive under the guise of being protective: ABUSERS!  You know who punishes their lovers with physical violence? ABUSERS! That’s why I don’t like this fantasy.

In my opinion, the female protagonist acting spunky doesn’t change the fact, the guy is an abusive ass.  I don’t even give them a second glance after they showed me their “alpha” side.  I don’t care if they can give the female money, fame, security or whatever else it is they want. Of course, one of the reason they can act this way, because often the story line is a redemptive tale: at some point the man will change for the woman. Or worse, the woman is forced to change for the man.

Overall, these novels demonstrate the old adage that men need respect, while women want love and attention. Screw that. Real people of all genders need love, respect, attention. That’s why I don’t like this storyline.

Thirdly: As an author and a reader, it annoys me when a character is broken down to what they can give the protagonist. (Money to buy the perfect present, throbbing members, and a six pack are apparently the most common desirable traits for men.) That’s just sad… and what super-confused-guy was talking about.

The characters (and men in real life) who I find sexy are men who respect women. They are strong in their own right, they have no need to rule over anyone. Women and men are equals. Maybe they mess up, because that’s bound to happen, but I want the characters to be alive.

As an author, I write about people. I want my male characters to be more than flights of female fantasy. I want them to live and breath. And if my reader falls in love with one of them, I want you to fall for their whole selves.

lunaThat brings me to re-introducing Ian Marcus Weaver Whitlatch from The Light Side of the Moon. I’m guessing, he will never be anyone’s book boyfriend, but even if he’s not, I hope he lives in your minds…

Original character dossier

One of the chosen to go to Kipos: Ian does not go because of his parents wishes. He grows up longing for space travel and gets the chance to go to the Lunar Colony.

Family:
Mother Grace Alice Teague Weaver
Father: Royce Xavier Langly Whitlatch
No siblings. Parents had to fight infertility even to have Ian.

Status: He is a small-town doctor and a manager of a soup kitchen’s son. So his family is loved, but he is not rich. Later, he is a prison doctor.

Looks: Straight brown hair, green eyes, big nose, high forehead. Slender build, 6 ft even. Mother comments Ian has Dad’s looks, Ian is not sure if that is a compliment.

Personality: Introverted, so his friends tend to be close ones.  Kind to children.
Virtues: Idealist, romantizes space travel, democratic, believes in equality, looks to the future

Vices: Presumptuous and can be snobby

Excerpt

Ian knew he should feel pride at his achievement, but all he felt was anti-climatic nothingness. His dark suit fit him well enough, but the plain white collared shirt and black bow-tie cut off the circulation to his head. Sweating under the student gown covered with full sleeves, embroidered hood, and cap, he waited to enter the Senate House. No one spoke to him, so he pulled out his pocket-sized YRUniverse. As Ian looked around at the assembled faces of his classmates, he couldn’t find joy in the others’ accomplishments. Most made it clear a small-town doctor’s son was not worth their friendship, or even their contempt.

A notice acknowledged another press release from the Tallier Groupe. He clicked on it hoping it was about Serenitatis. Or Ivonne Tallier. He loved reading about her. The message was another mission update from the astronauts confirmed there was power being drawn into the cabling of the space elevator by the Earth’s magnetic fields.

Through the door, the Vice Chancellor of Medicinal Sciences congratulated the hard work of the graduands. The entire theater clapped politely. He slipped his YRUniverse in his pocket.

Mary glanced behind her with a nervous smile to another woman, showing her pretty white teeth. Catching Ian’s eye, she gave him an “it’s okay” signal. 

His parents hadn’t arranged a marriage for him, nor had hers. He almost asked Mary to be his wife, but she decided she wasn’t interested in him “that way” and dated another half-dozen men from their class who hadn’t interested her either. She wanted them to remain friends. They did. Sort of. It would help if her presence didn’t arouse in him the need to hold her and make her laugh.

Dad gave him rubbers–with explicit instructions to use them every time he had premarital sex— but in his four years at Oxford, he hadn’t dated anyone else. He felt tongue-tied around girls. Even when they wanted sexual relations, most of his classmates had chaperones to make sure they didn’t do anything to disrupt their organized marriages. Sometimes it felt as if he would never meet a girl. His family was too poor to be of interest to wealthy families, too wealthy for Ian to slum around the factory workers of Salisbury…

So that’s the kind of characters I like. What kinds of characters do you love or hate?

Review for Dan Thompson’s Here Lies Love

Here Lies LoveHere Lies Love by Dan Thompson
My rating: 5 of 5 stars

Dan Thompson’s Here Lies Love is a compelling and dark piece of dystopic fiction about a young girl sold into sexual slavery by her father. Life is hard as people eek out a meager living after the sun has died. The plotting is fast paced with gorgeous detailed settings.

He deals with Abbey’s paranoia and post traumatic stress in a realistic way.

I have only one minor complaint. Abbey seems a bit too naive for what has happened to her–especially when we find out why Dad sold her. I don’t want to go into details about this, because I don’t want to give a spoiler.

She grew up in the world, but she doesn’t seem to understand the way the world works. Now I could deal with that she is naive, except she has a fantastic vocabulary. Now she was educated somewhat by her grandmother, but words during her point of view chapters like egress (rather than exit, escape, or whatever) seem out of character for a naive seventeen year old who is trying to escape her captor. And when I saw certain words, I thought, huh? However Thompson is an English author, not an American author, so perhaps egress is more commonly used in the UK, then it is in America.

Overall, terrific novel.

I also read and enjoyed Thompson’sThe Caseworker’s Memoirs which is a completely different genre, but also quite good.

View all my reviews

Chapter Headings — love ‘em or hate ‘em?

Since somehow I started writing these epics that span years, I also did chapter headings. I want to know how you feel about them. Other Systems had dates. The Light Side of the Moon might have dates and/or places.

 

Science Fiction Birthday Recommendations?

My birthday is next month and my mom always wants to know what I want. So let’s help Mom out, I’m looking for some recommendations for some good science fiction books.Aistiu_space

Either new or old is fine. I prefer space exploration, but don’t mind military scifi. I love gender issues, but no misogamy or misandry in the storylines as it just ticks me off.

For example: I loved Forever War by Joe Haldeman and the Memoirs of a Spacewoman by Naomi Mitchison since those books touch on gender issues and changing sexuality in the story, I hated Ring World by Larry Niven due to the outright sexism. (Don’t get me started on Heinlein’s views on women)

I am not really into romance. If the romance is the major plot, rather than a subplot I generally don’t enjoy the book. For example I enjoyed how in Dune, Paul’s marriage is important politically, but it is not the plot of the entire book.

And no erotica. Thanks.

So if you have read or written a science fiction book that you think I’ll like, feel free to post that to the comments too.

Photos from Federal Way Library Meet the Author Event!

Here are the photos from the Federal Way Library Meet the Author Event! 

Here are:
Aubry Andersen, author of the serialized novel: Isaac the Fortunate and illustrator of Insomnium 
Zachary Bonelli, of Fuzzy Hedgehog Press author of Insomnium and Voyage: Embarkation 
Elizabeth Guizzetti, author and illustrator of Other Systems 

Sci-Fi-Fantasy_24May2014 FW (1) Sci-Fi-Fantasy_24May2014 FW (3) Sci-Fi-Fantasy_24May2014 FW (2)

Science Fiction Fantasy Afternoon at Federal Way Library!

library Facebook

Pacific Northwest Science Fiction & Fantasy Fans!  I along with authors Zachary Bonelli and Aubry Andersen will be be at Federal Way Library to read from our books and discuss science fiction and fantasy!

2 pm – 3:30

Federal Way Library
34200 1st Way S
Federal Way, Washington 98003
(253) 838-3668
http://www.kcls.org

For more information please check out: http://www.facebook.com/events/643438919054063/

Other Systems Making Connections Blog Tour

Other Systems will be shown on all these awesome blogs this week May 19th – May 25th. Check out every blog for your chance to win some great prizes! US/CANADA – signed 8×10 Act break prints from Act 3; INTERNATIONAL – eBooks plus 5 space wallpapers! Other Systems Cover

May 19th: 1st stop:
Michael Sci Fan – Interview

2nd stop:
Evening eBook – Review 

May 20th:
Beanie Brain Reader – Review

May 21st:

Giovanni Valentino – Interview

May 22nd

Judith Leger – Promo

 

Part3

US/Canada Readers: Want to win this print? Check out each stop on the blog tour!

May 24th

A Readers Review – Promo 

May 25th:
Making Connections Blog – Interview

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